Chester County Challenge

Trees and slopes, oh my! Discover how we designed an effective solar system on this shaded and rolling property that not only exceeds production estimates but maintains the aesthetics and beauty of this gorgeous home and landscape.

We work hard to get our customers what they want. This project required 44 modules. The roof area was constrained by trees, and the ground was constrained by a steep slope, property line setbacks. Additionally, we did not want to interrupt the views from the house across this lovely country property and into the woods.

Our solution, split the system up by using approx. 1/3rd of the modules on the roof with microinverters (due to shade possibilities), and the remaining 2/3rds on the ground. We kept the ground array at a low slope* to better conceal it from view. It was remarkably successful and has been exceeding production estimates.

*Tilt or slope of an array is not nearly as critical as orientation. 42*, roughly equal to our latitude, is good for a better average monthly production. A steeper slope will give you increased winter production, and a lower slope will give you greater summer production, which is really the best choice.

Why? The ideal angle of incidence at which the sun hits a module is 90*. At our latitude, on winter solstice Dec.21st, the sun is roughly 22.5* degrees above the horizon. At summer solstice it is approximately 70* above the horizon. Therefore, when the days are longer in the summer, a lower sloped array will be closer to 90* to the sun, and since the days are longer, the collection time is greatly increased.

Trees and slopes, oh my! Discover how we designed an effective solar system on this shaded and rolling property that not only exceeds production estimates but maintains the aesthetics and beauty of this gorgeous home and landscape.

We work hard to get our customers what they want. This project required 44 modules. The roof area was constrained by trees, and the ground was constrained by a steep slope, property line setbacks. Additionally, we did not want to interrupt the views from the house across this lovely country property and into the woods.

Our solution, split the system up by using approx. 1/3rd of the modules on the roof with microinverters (due to shade possibilities), and the remaining 2/3rds on the ground. We kept the ground array at a low slope* to better conceal it from view. It was remarkably successful and has been exceeding production estimates.

*Tilt or slope of an array is not nearly as critical as orientation. 42*, roughly equal to our latitude, is good for a better average monthly production. A steeper slope will give you increased winter production, and a lower slope will give you greater summer production, which is really the best choice.

Why? The ideal angle of incidence at which the sun hits a module is 90*. At our latitude, on winter solstice Dec.21st, the sun is roughly 22.5* degrees above the horizon. At summer solstice it is approximately 70* above the horizon. Therefore, when the days are longer in the summer, a lower sloped array will be closer to 90* to the sun, and since the days are longer, the collection time is greatly increased.

Got a question or a comment?
Send us a message!

SunPower Builders

PA’S ORIGINAL SOLAR COMPANY AND GREEN BUILDING EXPERTS, is a Philadelphia-area design-build firm that has worked in the solar and residential construction industries since 1972. We specialize in farmhouse renovations, solar homes, historic restorations and residential remodeling. Our unparalleled experience in design and construction guarantees a great experience and quality project.

Visit Us

Submit Your Electric Bill for a FREE ESTIMATE

Hello!

Submit Your Electric Bill for a FREE Solar Cost Analysis

Got questions? Submit them here!

SunPower Builders